Subjects – Syria Report

Expropriations

News

20-02-2024
The United States has doubled down on its Syria sanctions strategy with the passing of the ‘Assad Regime Anti-Normalization Act of 2023’ at the House of Representatives on February 14.
20-06-2023
Earlier this year, a company linked to the Katerji family began construction work on commercial and residential complexes in Marota City. Marota City is an upscale real estate development that is being built on expropriated land and informal settlements in areas that were largely opposed to the government during the Syrian uprising. This luxurious development project launched more than ten years ago has largely failed to attract investment so far, although several regime cronies showed initial interest in it.
10-01-2023
Law No. 33 of 2008 on Documenting Ownership of Built Real Estate and Parts of Unbuilt Real Estate was issued to resolve ownership issues related to unlicensed construction and real estate subdivision in informal settlements. Law No. 33 aims to establish and record these properties within the Land Registry according to their reality on the ground, under certain conditions. 

Library

20-09-2022
This report covers administrative units, how units are determined, the various levels of governance, the financial and administrative independence these units enjoy, and the local councils responsible for governing the units, their members, and their sources of revenues.
28-06-2022
This report provides an overview of the Syrian cement sector, including the challenges faced by the industry, the latest production and trade data, and a list of the main actors.
07-06-2022
Damascus Cham Holding Private JSC (DCH) is a private sector holding company fully owned by the Damascus governorate. In 2016, it was set up to develop and manage two large real estate areas in Damascus, as well as various other projects on behalf of the governorate. The largest – and most controversial – of these projects is Marota City, considered by many to be “Syria’s Solidere,” in reference to the controversial Lebanese firm that developed Beirut’s devastated downtown after that country’s 1975-90 civil war.