Iran is furthering its reach in Syria’s education sector while the Syrian government seems unable to meet its promises to invest in that sector.
As they seek to gain influence and access to Syrian resources, Iran and Russia are also expanding ties with Damascus in the education sector.
A Syrian Christian charity established after the beginning of the uprising has been granted the right to set up a private university in Syria.
Despite the decline in the size of the population, official data indicate that the number of university students has increased relative to 2010.
The very poor position of Syrian universities in a global ranking for higher education institutions highlights the dismal level of teaching and research in Syria.
A new private university backed by the Syrian first lady has opened its doors in the coastal city of Lattakia.
Syria’s Kurds are launching a university in the city of Qamishli, the second in the space of one year.
The struggle over the language taught in Syrian education institutions is an increasing source of tension between the government and the Kurdish Union Democratic Party.
The number of Syrian children who entered school this year remained stable relative to 2015 after four consecutive years of decline.
The Syrian President has issued a decree establishing two new faculties in the University of Tartous.
The Interim Government, the executive arm of the National Coalition, is planning to open a university in Aleppo to host students living in opposition areas.
Syria’s school year began yesterday as the number of schooled children continues to decline.
The Syrian government has established a university in Tartous, the seventh such institution to be established in the country.
The Ministry of Education has tripled its estimate of the losses the sector suffered from the war, from its figure of only a year and a half ago.
A department of Russian Literature opened last week at Damascus University, as the Syrian Government seeks to highlight its strengthening ties with Moscow.